North Carolina’s Moravian Potters: The Art and Mystery of Pottery-Making in Wachovia

Author(s): Stephen Compton

ISBN: 9781634991223
Copies: 110
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North Carolina’s eighteenth and nineteenth-century Moravian potters were remarkable artisans whose products included coarse earthenware, slip-trailed decorated ware, Leeds-type fine pottery, press-molded stove tiles, figural bottles, toys, and salt-glazed stoneware.
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North Carolina’s eighteenth and nineteenth-century Moravian potters were remarkable artisans whose products included coarse earthenware, slip-trailed decorated ware, Leeds-type fine pottery, press-molded stove tiles, figural bottles, toys, and salt-glazed stoneware.

Silesian-born and German-trained potter Gottfried Aust was the first to arrive in Bethabara in 1755. After that, numerous apprentices of his carried on the trade in the state and beyond. Some apprentices rose to the rank of master potter. Aust’s most successful protégé, Rudolph Christ, excelled in the creation of Queensware, faience, and tortoiseshell-glazed pottery.

Swiss-born Heinrich Schaffner, one of several more Moravian master potters, is famously known for his “Salem smoking pipes.” Today, museums and private collectors vigorously compete for scarce examples of North Carolina-made Moravian pottery.

Every piece found and preserved is like a new paragraph added to the story of the art and mystery of pottery-making in one of the South’s earliest settlements.

BOOK ISBN 9781634991223
FORMAT 248 x 172 mm
BINDING Paperback
PAGES 144 pages
PUBLICATION DATE 29 April 2019
TERRITORY World
ILLUSTRATIONS 165 colour and black-and-white photographs






Stephen Compton is an avid collector of mid-18th to mid-20th century North Carolina pottery. Steve has written numerous articles and books about it, including, North Carolina Pottery: Earthenware, Stoneware, and Fancyware (Collector Books, 2011), and Seagrove Potteries Through Time (Fonthill Media, 2013). Widely recognized for his expertise, he is frequently called upon to be a lecturer and exhibit curator. He once served as president of the North Carolina Pottery Center, a museum and educational center located in Seagrove, NC, and is a founding organizer of the North Carolina Pottery Collectors’ Guild. Steve resides with his wife in Raleigh, NC.


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