The Lancashire Derbyshire and East Coast Railway: A LD&ECR Miscellany, the Mansfield Railway and Mid-Nott’s Joint Railway Connections

Author(s): Chris Booth 

ISBN: 9781781558027
Copies in stock: 354
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£20.00

A journey along the self-styled ‘Dukeries Route’ railway and its connections, from yesteryear to today in words and pictures.
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  • Discover the Lancashire Derbyshire and East Coast Railway, the ‘Dukeries Route’

  • Read about its various connecting lines the Mansfield Railway and Mid-Nott’s joint railway connections

  • Maps, diagrams and many unpublished images in mono and colour

  • Highly informative and of much interest to the historian, enthusiast and modeller
In the days when coal was “King” plans were laid for an east-to-west cross-country railway, to connect Warrington to a new dock near the east coast village of Sutton On Sea. Entitled The Lancashire, Derbyshire and East Coast Railway, as history was to show only the Chesterfield to Pyewipe Junction section and a branch from Langwith to Beighton would ever be completed.

Taken over by the G.C.R. in 1907, although primarily a coal carrying railway it had a passenger service that lasted in parts until 1955. This Volume looks back at the very beginnings of plans for the LD&ECR and we will also take a look at two more connecting lines, namely the Mansfield Railway and the Mid Nottinghamshire Joint Railway. The Mansfield Railway would become a huge influence in moving coal along the LD&ECR lines and is an interesting story in its own right. Discover the self-styled “Dukeries Route” and its connections through the lenses of photographers from a period of over 100 years.

BOOK ISBN 9781781558027
FORMAT 248 x 172 mm
BINDING Paperback
PAGES 192 pages
PUBLICATION DATE 30 June 2020
TERRITORY World
ILLUSTRATIONS 210 colour photographs

 

 





Chris Booth has been fascinated in the Lancashire Derbyshire and East Coast Railway since reading the books The Lancashire Derbyshire and East Coast Railway and Langwith Junction: The Life and Times of a Railway Village. Since then, apart from the odd article in the railway press, little else on this railway line has been seen in book form.

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